Helping Seniors
and Caregivers
of all ages achieve their personal
dreams in Life

 

Caregiver's Journey

 

Through the role of caregiver, we recognized the need for support of the caregiver.  In educating the caregiver, we can help ensure the care they are providing is safe for both the patient and themselves.  Further, we strive to provide emotional support so that the caregiver is taking care of their own mental and physical needs while caregiving.  Too many times, the caregiver suffers more than the person for whom they are providing care.

 

A caregiver is an unpaid individual (a spouse, partner, family member, friend, or neighbor) involved in assisting others with activities of daily living and/or medical tasks. Formal caregivers are paid care providers administering care in one's home or in a care setting (daycare, residential, care facility, etc).

 

  • 65.7 million caregivers make up 29% of the U.S. adult population providing care to someone who is ill, disabled or aged.

            [The National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP (2009), Caregiving in the U.S. National Alliance for Caregiving. Washington, DC.] - Updated: November 2012

 

  • 52 million caregivers provide care to adults (aged 18+) with a disability or illness.

            [Coughlin, J., (2010). Estimating the Impact of Caregiving and Employment on Well-Being: Outcomes & Insights in Health Management, Vol. 2; Issue 1] - Updated:
            November 2012

 

  • 43.5 million of adult family caregivers care for someone 50+ years of age and 14.9 million care for someone who has Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.

            [Alzheimer's Association, 2011 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, Alzheimer's and Dementia , Vol.7, Issue 2.] - Updated: November 2012

 

  • Caregiver services were valued at $450 billion per year in 2009- up from $375 billion in year 2007.

            [Valuing the Invaluable: 2011 Update, The Economic Value of Family Caregiving. AARP Public Policy Institute.] - Updated: November 2012

 

  • The value of unpaid family caregivers will likely continue to be the largest source of long-term care services in the U.S., and the aging population 65+ will more than double between the years 2000 and 2030, increasing to 71.5 million from 35.1 million in 2000.

            [Coughlin, J., (2010). Estimating the Impact of Caregiving and Employment on Well-Being: Outcomes & Insights in Health Management, Vol. 2; Issue 1] - Updated:
            November 2012

 

Youth caregivers are an unrecognized group making up between 12% and 18% of the total number of adult caregivers.  The American Public Health Association found this group of young adults important because they are at a critical development stage.  Read the article. They have passed the turbulence of early and mid-adolescence, but most have not yet solidified life plans and choices due to the web of responsibilities, close relationships, burdens and rewards.

 

According to the study, “youth caregivers are the unrecognized providers of care.  These children and adolescents provide significant assistance to relatives or household members who need help because of physical or mental illness, disability, frailty associated with aging, substance misuses, or other conditions.  Their responsibilities include personal care, medical care, household management, supervision, language translation in medical settings, and emotional support.  Indirect responsibilities include parenting siblings, and caring for the care recipients’ personal affairs.”

 

The dual roles performed by these students’ affects the children profoundly.  Students are unable to participate in extra-curricular activities, such as sports or music, which would afford them scholarship opportunities for college.  Concerted efforts are essential to ensure that young adults who become caregivers are not deterred from pursuing educational and life goals.

 

Regardless of age, caregiving for a loved one can take its toll and can change family dynamics. And providing care for a loved one can become highly stressful – whether your family member lives next door or thousands of miles away.

 

If you need help, you are not alone, Caregivers Support NetworkTM provides resources and support for thousands of caregivers across the nation just like you.  We can help you too.

 

CAREGIVERS SUPPORT NETWORK® 400 LAKE AVENUE NE, LARGO, FLORIDA 33771 |  727-674-1167

 

 

The Caregivers Support Network® is a 501(c)(3) Minnesota Corporation which is registered to conduct its affairs in Florida as a non-profit corporation.

 

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CH21777, AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY
CALLING TOLL-FREE (800.435.7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATIONS BY THE STATE.